A new study says a strong and black coffee taken after waking up from a insufficient night sleep adverse effects on blood sugar levels.

The center for Nutrition, Exercise & metabolism at University of Bath U.k analyzed the disturbed sleep over a variety of metabolic markers. The scientists indicated in the British Journal Nutrition a night of bad sleep has limited effect on the metabolism, having coffee to cheer you up from a sleep will have an adverse effect blood glucose ( control).

It is important to keep our blood sugar readings in normal range to eliminate risk of diabetes and heart diseases. Also it is said that these finding could lead to for reaching health problems more so taking into account the global reputation enjoyed by the coffee.

For their study, the physiologists at the University of Bath asked 29 healthy men and women to undergo three different overnight experiments in a random order:

  • On another, participants experienced the same sleep disruption (i.e. being woken throughout the night) but this time were first given a strong black coffee 30 minutes before consuming the sugary drink.
  • woke them every hour for five minutes) and then upon waking were given the same sugary drink.
  • In one, condition participants had a normal night’s sleep and were asked to consume a sugary drink on waking in the morning.

“Put simply, our blood sugar control is impaired when the first thing our bodies come into contact with is coffee especially after a night of disrupted sleep. We might improve this by eating first and then drinking coffee later if we feel we still feel the need it. Knowing this can have important health benefits for us all.”

“Lead researcher, Harry Smith from the Department for Health at Bath added: “These results show that one night of disrupted sleep alone did not worsen participants’ blood glucose/insulin response to the sugary drink compared to a normal night of sleep which will be reassuring to many of us. However, starting a day after a poor night’s sleep with a strong coffee did have a negative effect on glucose metabolism by around 50%.”

“As such, individuals should try to balance the potential stimulating benefits of caffeinated coffee in the morning with the potential for higher blood glucose levels and it may be better to consume coffee following breakfast rather than before.

“There is a lot more we need to learn about the effects of sleep on our metabolism, such as how much sleep disruption is necessary to impair our metabolism and what some of the longer-term implications of this are, as well as how exercise, for instance, could help to counter some of this.”